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'Hookah Smoking - An Age-old Modern Trend'.

Fri, 2015-03-27 07:18

'Hookah Smoking - An Age-old Modern Trend'.

J Family Med Prim Care. 2015 Jan-Mar;4(1):151

Authors: Sharma G, Nagpal A

PMID: 25811012 [PubMed]

Hookah use prevalence, predictors, and perceptions among Canadian youth: findings from the 2012/2013 Youth Smoking Survey.

Thu, 2015-03-19 06:13

Hookah use prevalence, predictors, and perceptions among Canadian youth: findings from the 2012/2013 Youth Smoking Survey.

Cancer Causes Control. 2015 Mar 18;

Authors: Minaker LM, Shuh A, Burkhalter RJ, Manske SR

Abstract
PURPOSE: Few national surveys currently assess hookah smoking among youth. This study describes the prevalence, patterns of use, and perceptions about hookah in a nationally representative survey of Canadian grades 9-12 students.
METHODS: The Youth Smoking Survey 2012/2013 was administered to 27,404 Canadian grades 9-12 students attending schools in nine Canadian provinces representing 96 % of Canadian population. Relevant dichotomous outcomes included ever use, use in the last 30 days, and the belief that hookah use is less harmful than cigarette smoking. Covariates included smoking status, sex, grade, province of residence, race/ethnicity, and amount of weekly spending money. Logistic regression models were used to examine: covariates related to the odds of ever and last-30-day hookah use; covariates related to perceptions about the harms of hookah smoking; the extent to which perceptions were associated with odds of hookah use; and whether survey year (2010/2011 or 2012/2013) was associated with hookah use, and marginal effects were calculated.
RESULTS: In Canada, 5.4 % of students in grades 9-12 currently use hookah and 14.3 % report ever using hookah. In 2012/2013, students had significantly higher odds of using hookah compared to students in 2010/2011 (OR 1.5, 95 % CI 1.2, 2.1). About half of hookah users (51 %) used flavored hookah. Students who believed that hookah use was less harmful than cigarette smoking had significantly higher odds of current hookah use (OR 2.6, 95 % CI 1.9, 3.5), as did students who reported higher amounts of weekly spending money. Current smokers had an 18 % higher predicted probability of currently using hookah compared to non-smokers.
CONCLUSIONS: Hookah use among youth is of growing concern in Canada. Findings can be used to inform policy development related to youth hookah smoking.

PMID: 25783457 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Abstinence Rates among College Cigarette Smokers Enrolled in A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Quit and Win Contests: The Impact of Concurrent Hookah Use.

Tue, 2015-03-17 06:29

Abstinence Rates among College Cigarette Smokers Enrolled in A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Quit and Win Contests: The Impact of Concurrent Hookah Use.

Prev Med. 2015 Mar 12;

Authors: Thomas JL, Bengtson JE, Wang Q, Luo X, Marigi E, Ghidei W, Ahluwalia JS

Abstract
OBJECTIVE: To examine baseline characteristics and biochemically verified 1-, 4-, and 6-month tobacco quit rates among college students enrolled in a Quit and Win cessation trial, comparing those who concurrently smoke both hookah and cigarettes with those who deny hookah use.
METHODS: Analyses were conducted on data from 1,217 college students enrolled in a Quit and Win tobacco cessation randomized clinical trial from 2010-2012. Multivariable logistic regression (MLR) analyses examined group differences in baseline characteristics and cotinine verified 30-day abstinence at 1, 4, and 6-month follow-up, adjusting for baseline covariates.
RESULTS: Participants smoked 11.5(±8.1) cigarettes per day on 28.5(±3.8) days/month, and 22% smoked hookah in the past 30 days. Hookah smokers (n=270) were more likely to be male (p<0.0001), younger (p<0.0001), report more binge drinking (p<0.0001) and score higher on impulsivity (p<0.001). MLR results indicate that hookah users, when compared to non-users, had a 36% decrease in odds of self-reported 30-day abstinence at 4-months (OR= 0.64, 95% CI=0.45-0.93, p=0.02) and a 63% decrease in odds in biochemically verified continuous abstinence at 6-months (OR = 0.37, CI=0.14-0.99, p=0.05).
CONCLUSION: College cigarette smokers who concurrently use hookah display several health risk factors and demonstrate lower short and long-term tobacco abstinence rates.

PMID: 25773472 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Polytobacco Use among College Students.

Sun, 2015-03-15 06:18

Polytobacco Use among College Students.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Mar 13;

Authors: Butler KM, Ickes MJ, Rayens MK, Wiggins AT, Hahn EJ

Abstract
Introduction Use of more than one tobacco product among college students is increasing in popularity, leading to nicotine addiction and additional health risks. The study 1) examined polytobacco use patterns among college students who had ever used tobacco; and 2) assessed the sociodemographic and personal factors associated with current polytobacco use, compared to current single product use and former tobacco use among college students. Methods Of 10,000 randomly selected college students from a large public university in the Southeast, a sample of 1,593 students age 18 or older completed an online survey assessing tobacco use and attitudes. Ever tobacco users were included in this study (n = 662, or 41.6% of survey completers). Results About 15% of ever users reported current polytobacco use, and more than 70% of polytobacco users smoked cigars, little cigars, or clove cigarettes in combination with one or more products. Cigarettes were the most commonly-used product among single users, followed by hookah. Males, underclassmen, and students with greater acceptance of cigarette use were more likely to be polytobacco users. Race/ethnicity was marginally related to polyuse status, with White/non-Hispanics 28% less likely to be polytobacco users versus single product users. Conclusions Polytobacco users were more likely than single users to consume emerging tobacco products, (i.e., hookah and e-cigarettes). Males, underclassmen, and racial/ethnic minorities were more at risk for polytobacco use. As young people are particularly prone to nicotine addiction, there is a need to further investigate polytobacco use among college students.

PMID: 25770131 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Parental smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke are associated with waterpipe smoking among youth: results from a national survey in Lebanon.

Tue, 2015-03-10 16:11
Related Articles

Parental smoking and exposure to environmental tobacco smoke are associated with waterpipe smoking among youth: results from a national survey in Lebanon.

Public Health. 2015 Mar 3;

Authors: Jawad M, Nakkash RT, Mahfoud Z, Bteddini D, Haddad P, Afifi RA

Abstract
OBJECTIVES: Waterpipe tobacco smoking (WTS) is a growing public health concern worldwide yet little is known about the epidemiology of use among young people. The objectives of this study were to examine the prevalence, patterns and correlates of WTS among students across Lebanon.
STUDY DESIGN: The study design was a cross sectional survey.
METHODS: 126-item tobacco questionnaire was conducted among 1128 sixth and seventh grade students across Lebanon. Current patterns of use were descriptively analysed, and logistic regression models examined correlates of WTS.
RESULTS: Ever WTS prevalence was 44.3%, current WTS prevalence was triple that of cigarettes (22.1% vs 7.4%), and 40.0% of current users were at least weekly or daily smokers. Initiation and patterns of use, as well as addiction and cessation attitudes have been reported. Significant correlates of current WTS included older age, reduced religiosity, peer and parent tobacco use, recent waterpipe advertisement exposure, increased pluralistic ignorance and current cigarette use. Significant correlates of ever WTS were similar to current WTS, but included second hand waterpipe tobacco smoke exposure at home and did not include recent waterpipe advertisement exposure. Neither gender nor socio-economic status were significant correlates of current or ever WTS.
CONCLUSIONS: Waterpipe is the most common form of tobacco smoking, and is used regularly, among sixth and seventh grade Lebanese students. It should be considered a public health priority with increased tobacco surveillance and legislation. Widespread educational and policy interventions might help denormalize the social acceptability of WTS. Meanwhile, more research is needed to understand the changing paradigm of WTS epidemiology and the health outcomes among young smokers.

PMID: 25749674 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Quit_line treatment protocols for users of non-cigarette tobacco and nicotine containing products.

Tue, 2015-03-10 16:11
Related Articles

Quit_line treatment protocols for users of non-cigarette tobacco and nicotine containing products.

Addict Behav. 2015 Feb 21;45C:259-262

Authors: Linde BD, Ebbert JO, Wayne Talcott G, Klesges RC

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Use of non-cigarette tobacco and nicotine containing products (TNCPs) is increasing in the US. Telephone tobacco quit lines (QLs) are one of the most widely disseminated tools for providing cessation services to cigarette smokers, but the range of QL treatment services offered to non-cigarette TNCP users needs to be determined.
METHODS: We surveyed QLs across 50 US states, Washington D.C., and Guam for the number of treatment protocols offered, products they were intended to treat, and how telephone counselors triaged patients reporting the use of non-cigarette TNCPs.
RESULTS: Thirteen organizations provided US QL interventions of which eleven agreed to be interviewed regarding their treatment services (84.6%). Seven of the eleven QL providers (63.6%) used a single intervention protocol adapted to the type of non-cigarette TNCP used. Two of the eleven QLs (18.2%) referred hookah users to another provider and one QL (9.1%) referred electronic cigarette users to third party resources for cessation support; otherwise a single intervention protocol was used for all other TNCP users. Only one QL (9.1%) had a specialized protocol for smokeless tobacco users in addition to a standard protocol for all other callers.
CONCLUSIONS: QL providers do not have access to tailored protocols for non-cigarette TNCP users, and it remains uncertain whether a common tobacco protocol will be efficacious for these users. Future research should both validate potential common protocols for non-cigarette TNCP users and address the need for and the development of specialized QL interventions for TNCP users to help them quit.

PMID: 25746358 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

[Spatio-temporal dynamics of fishing effort in a multi-species artisanal diving fishery and its effects on catch variability: insights for sustainable management].

Sat, 2015-02-28 13:33

[Spatio-temporal dynamics of fishing effort in a multi-species artisanal diving fishery and its effects on catch variability: insights for sustainable management].

Rev Biol Trop. 2014 Dec;62(4):1565-86

Authors: Naranjo Madrigall H, Salas Marquez S

Abstract
Artisanal diving fisheries are a source of income, employment and food security of coastal areas in many countries. Understanding the dynamics of these fisheries, including the spatial and temporal dynamics of fishing effort, gears and species can help to address the challenges involved in fisheries management. We aimed to analyze the differences in fishing strategies undertaken by fishers that use two different diving methods (hookah and free diving), the conditions and their potential impacts on catches when adjustments to those strategies are applied over time. For this, detailed information of fishing operations from artisanal boats in the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica was analyzed in two fishing seasons (2007-2008 and 2011-2012). Data were collected by onboard observers (fishing site, fishing time, species composition, depth and visibility). Additionally, interviews with divers were applied to obtain information of price per species, species volume and fishing operations. From the total number of trips during both seasons, hookah diving was represented by a sample size of 69.3%, while free diving, with a sample of 41.9%. More than 15 species were identified in each fishing season. Nevertheless, three categories had substantial contributions in both seasons with differences in the proportions for each case: green lobster (Panulirus gracilis), octopus (Octopus sp.) and parrotfish (Scarus perrico and S. ghobban). It is worth noting that an important proportion of catch was retained by fishers for personal consumption purposes, including species of high commercial value. Additional night diving activity, increased the number of dives from one season to another. Besides, cooperation processes in free diving fishing operations, and changes in fishing effort between seasons, defined important changes in fishing strategies. Potential causes of changes in fishing strategies and the implications for management to ensure the sustainability of these fisheries in the long term are discussed.

PMID: 25720188 [PubMed - in process]

A Web-Based Program to Increase Knowledge and Reduce Cigarette and Nargila Smoking Among Arab University Students in Israel: Mixed-Methods Study to Test Acceptability.

Tue, 2015-02-24 06:53

A Web-Based Program to Increase Knowledge and Reduce Cigarette and Nargila Smoking Among Arab University Students in Israel: Mixed-Methods Study to Test Acceptability.

J Med Internet Res. 2015;17(2):e39

Authors: Essa-Hadad J, Linn S, Rafaeli S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Among Arab citizens in Israel, cigarette and nargila (hookah, waterpipe) smoking is a serious public health problem, particularly among the young adult population. With the dramatic increase of Internet and computer use among Arab college and university students, a Web-based program may provide an easy, accessible tool to reduce smoking rates without heavy resource demands required by traditional methods.
OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this research was to examine the acceptability and feasibility of a pilot Web-based program that provides tailored feedback to increase smoking knowledge and reduce cigarette and nargila smoking behaviors among Arab college/university students in Israel.
METHODS: A pilot Web-based program was developed, consisting of a self-administered questionnaire and feedback system on cigarette and nargila smoking. Arab university students were recruited to participate in a mixed-methods study, using both quantitative (pre-/posttest study design) and qualitative tools. A posttest was implemented at 1 month following participation in the intervention to assess any changes in smoking knowledge and behaviors. Focus group sessions were implemented to assess acceptability and preferences related to the Web-based program.
RESULTS: A total of 225 participants-response rate of 63.2% (225/356)-completed the intervention at baseline and at 1-month poststudy, and were used for the comparative analysis. Statistically significant reductions in nargila smoking among participants (P=.001) were found. The intervention did not result in reductions in cigarette smoking. However, the tailored Web intervention resulted in statistically significant increases in the intention to quit smoking (P=.021). No statistically significant increases in knowledge were seen at 1-month poststudy. Participants expressed high satisfaction with the intervention and 93.8% (211/225) of those who completed the intervention at both time intervals reported that they would recommend the program to their friends, indicating excellent acceptability and feasibility of the intervention. This was further emphasized in the focus group sessions.
CONCLUSIONS: A tailored Web-based program may be a promising tool to reduce nargila smoking among Arab university students in Israel. The tailored Web intervention was not successful at significantly reducing cigarette smoking or increasing knowledge. However, the intervention did increase participants' intention to quit smoking. Participants considered the Web-based tool to be an interesting, feasible, and highly acceptable strategy.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: Trial Registration: ISRCTN registry ISRCTN59207794; http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN59207794 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6VkYOBNOJ).

PMID: 25707034 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training.

Fri, 2015-02-20 06:06

Lung function profiles and aerobic capacity of adult cigarette and hookah smokers after 12 weeks intermittent training.

Libyan J Med. 2015;10:26680

Authors: Koubaa A, Triki M, Trabelsi H, Masmoudi L, Zeghal KN, Sahnoun Z, Hakim A

Abstract
INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary function is compromised in most smokers. Yet it is unknown whether exercise training improves pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers and whether these smokers respond in a similar way as do non-smokers.
AIM: To evaluate the effects of an interval exercise training program on pulmonary function and aerobic capacity in cigarette and hookah smokers.
METHODS: Twelve cigarette smokers, 10 hookah smokers, and 11 non-smokers participated in our exercise program. All subjects performed 30 min of interval exercise (2 min of work followed by 1 min of rest) three times a week for 12 weeks at an intensity estimated at 70% of the subject's maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max). Pulmonary function was measured using spirometry, and maximum aerobic capacity was assessed by maximal exercise testing on a treadmill before the beginning and at the end of the exercise training program.
RESULTS: As expected, prior to the exercise intervention, the cigarette and hookah smokers had significantly lower pulmonary function than the non-smokers. The 12-week exercise training program did not significantly affect lung function as assessed by spirometry in the non-smoker group. However, it significantly increased both forced expiratory volume in 1 second and peak expiratory flow (PEF) in the cigarette smoker group, and PEF in the hookah smoker group. Our training program had its most notable impact on the cardiopulmonary system of smokers. In the non-smoker and cigarette smoker groups, the training program significantly improved VO2max (4.4 and 4.7%, respectively), v VO2max (6.7 and 5.6%, respectively), and the recovery index (7.9 and 10.5%, respectively).
CONCLUSIONS: After 12 weeks of interval training program, the increase of VO2max and the decrease of recovery index and resting heart rate in the smoking subjects indicated better exercise tolerance. Although the intermittent training program altered pulmonary function only partially, both aerobic capacity and life quality were improved. Intermittent training should be advised in the clinical setting for subjects with adverse health behaviors.

PMID: 25694204 [PubMed - in process]

Understanding Attitudes, Beliefs, and Information Seeking Regarding Hookah Smoking in Parents of College Students: An Exploratory Qualitative Pilot Study.

Thu, 2015-02-19 06:45

Understanding Attitudes, Beliefs, and Information Seeking Regarding Hookah Smoking in Parents of College Students: An Exploratory Qualitative Pilot Study.

Respir Care. 2015 Feb 17;

Authors: Calvanese AV, Bingham MV, Martinasek MP, Friesen BK

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Hookah smoking has become increasingly common among young adults in the United States. College students engage in hookah smoking due to the increased exposure and popularity of hookah bars surrounding college campuses. There is limited information on parental perceptions of college students' hookah smoking.
METHODS: Forty-four telephone interviews were recorded and transcribed with parents of college students using a structured interview guide to explore perceptions, beliefs, behaviors, and information seeking regarding hookah smoking. The transcripts were coded and categorized using NVivo software, and emerging themes were uncovered.
RESULTS: Parents were lacking in awareness and knowledge of hookah smoking and health consequences. They often equated hookah smoking with bong use from their own college experiences. Although negative effects were equated with cigarette smoking, some parents reported beneficial effects of hookah smoking. Some parents disapproved of their college students smoking hookah, whereas others felt it was important that they try new behaviors in moderation. The varying responses indicate that parents were not receiving consistent messages, if any, regarding hookah tobacco smoking.
CONCLUSIONS: Informing parents of current novel risky behaviors such as hookah smoking is necessary as they are trusted sources of information for young adult children. Delivering information and educational messages to both students and their parents may be a worthy approach when developing campaigns to deter hookah smoking. There is a need to deter hookah smoking, as it remains a public health concern.

PMID: 25691766 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

The Use of Fluorescence Technology versus Visual and Tactile Examination in the Detection of Oral Lesions: A Pilot Study.

Thu, 2015-02-19 06:45

The Use of Fluorescence Technology versus Visual and Tactile Examination in the Detection of Oral Lesions: A Pilot Study.

J Dent Hyg. 2015 Feb;89(1):63-71

Authors: Ayoub HM, Newcomb TL, McCombs GB, Bonnie M

Abstract
PURPOSE: This study compared the effectiveness of the VELscope® Vx versus visual and tactile intraoral examination in detecting oral lesions in an adult, high risk population.
METHODS: The pilot study compared the intra oral findings between 2 examination types. The sample was comprised of 30 participants who were addicted to either cigarettes or a dual addiction (cigarettes plus hookah). High risk population was defined as males who were current cigarette smokers or had a dual addiction. Two trained and experienced licensed dental hygienists conducted all examinations. Throughout the study, all visual and tactile intraoral examinations were conducted first by one dental hygienist first, followed by the VELscope® Vx fluorescence examinations by the second dental hygienist. All subjects received an inspection of the lips, labial and buccal mucosa, floor of the mouth, dorsal, ventral and lateral sides of the tongue, hard and soft palate, and visual inspection of the oropharynx and uvula. Both evaluations took place in 1 visit in the Dental Hygiene Research Center at Old Dominion University and external sites. All participants received oral cancer screening information, recommendations, referrals for tobacco cessation programs and brochures on the 2 types of examinations conducted.
RESULTS: Participants were considered high risk based on demographics (current smokers and mostly males). Neither visual and tactile intraoral examination nor the VELscope® Vx examination showed positive lesions. No lesions were detected; therefore, no referrals were made. Data indicated the duration of tobacco use was significantly higher in cigarette smokers (14.1 years) than dual addiction smokers (5 years) (p>0.005). The average numbers of cigarettes smoked per day were 13.5 compared to 14.2 cigarettes for dual addiction smokers.
CONCLUSION: Results from this study suggest the visual and tactile intraoral examination produced comparative results to the VELscope® Vx examination. Findings from this study support that the VELscope® Vx is still considered an adjunct technology and cannot be used exclusively for oral cancer screening.

PMID: 25690067 [PubMed - in process]

Prevalence of Dokha Use among Secondary School Students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

Tue, 2015-02-17 06:17

Prevalence of Dokha Use among Secondary School Students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2015;16(2):427-30

Authors: Shemmari NA, Shaikh RB, Sreedharan J

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Dokha is a novel form of smoking in United Arab Emirates (UAE) on which there is very little published literature, especially among adolescents, and this form of smoking has been not been addressed adequately in the smoking cessation strategies in the UAE.
OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of dokha smoking among male secondary school students in Ajman UAE.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross sectional survey was conducted among male secondary school students in Ajman, UAE. A total of 560 participants filled in self- administered questionnaires.
RESULTS: The prevalence of ever smokers was 39%; ever dokha smokers was 36% and current dokha smokers was 24%. The prevalence is very high when compared to other forms of smoking in the region and globally. Prevalence increased with increasing age and grade of students, prevalence of ever smokers, ever dokha smokers and current dokha smokers was lower in students in the science stream. 40% of the smokers used dokha, cigarettes and shisha, 30% used dokha and cigarettes, and 21% used dokha alone. 30% of the students smoked dokha on all days of the month.
CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of ever smokers, ever dokha smokers and current dokha smokers is very high. There is an urgent need for specific health promotion programs tailored to this age group on prevention of dokha smoking and policies restricting the availability of dokha to this age group.

PMID: 25684466 [PubMed - in process]

Youth Tobacco Product Use in the United States.

Wed, 2015-02-04 15:54

Youth Tobacco Product Use in the United States.

Pediatrics. 2015 Feb 2;

Authors: Lee YO, Hebert CJ, Nonnemaker JM, Kim AE

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Noncigarette tobacco products are increasingly popular among youth, especially cigarette smokers. Understanding multiple tobacco product use is necessary to assess the effects of tobacco products on population health. This study examines multiple tobacco product use and associated risk factors among US youth.
METHODS: Estimates of current use were calculated for cigarettes, cigars, smokeless tobacco, hookah, e-cigarettes, pipes, bidis, kreteks, snus, and dissolvable tobacco by using data from the 2012 National Youth Tobacco Survey (n = 24?658), a nationally representative sample of US middle and high school students. Associations between use patterns and demographic characteristics were examined by using multinomial logistic regression.
RESULTS: Among youth, 14.7% currently use 1 or more tobacco products. Of these, 2.8% use cigarettes exclusively, and 4% use 1 noncigarette product exclusively; 2.7% use cigarettes with another product (dual use), and 4.3% use 3 or more products (polytobacco use). Twice as many youth use e-cigarettes alone than dual use with cigarettes. Among smokers, polytobacco use was significantly associated with male gender (adjusted relative risk ratio [aRRR] = 3.71), by using flavored products (aRRR = 6.09), nicotine dependence (aRRR = 1.91), tobacco marketing receptivity (aRRR = 2.52), and perceived prevalence of peer use of tobacco products (aRRR = 3.61, 5.73).
CONCLUSIONS: More than twice as many youth in the United States currently use 2 or more tobacco products than cigarettes alone. Continued monitoring of tobacco use patterns is warranted, especially for e-cigarettes. Youth rates of multiple product use involving combustible products underscore needs for research assessing potential harms associated with these patterns.

PMID: 25647680 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

College Students View Hookah as a Safe Alternative to Cigarettes.

Wed, 2015-02-04 06:23

College Students View Hookah as a Safe Alternative to Cigarettes.

JAMA. 2015 Feb 3;313(5):456

Authors:

PMID: 25647197 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Risk Factors associated with Hookah use.

Wed, 2015-02-04 06:23

Risk Factors associated with Hookah use.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Feb 2;

Authors: Cavazos PA, Krauss MJ, Kim Y, Emery S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Potential harms associated with hookah smoking are largely unrecognized and it is emerging as a trendy behavior. To help inform policy and preventive interventions, we used responses from a population survey of US adults to examine risk factors associated with hookah involvement.
METHOD: An online survey of 17,522 US adults was conducted in 2013. The nationally representative sample was drawn from GfK Group's KnowledgePanel plus off-panel recruitment. Multinomial logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between tobacco use patterns across multiple products (cigarettes, cigars, dissolvables), perceived harms towards regular pipe/hookah use, and demographic characteristics with hookah involvement (never used, ever used with/without reusing intent).
RESULT: Nearly 1 in 5 (16%) of the respondents had smoked hookah at least once in their life ("ever users"). Ever users of hookah were at higher risk of having used cigarettes, cigars, and dissolvable tobacco products (all p<.01). Odds for hookah use were greater for those who perceived regular pipe/hookah use as less dangerous (p<.05). Odds for hookah involvement were higher among young adults (p<.001), individuals with higher educational attainment (p<.01), and Hispanics/Latinos (p<.05).
CONCLUSIONS: Information about the public health harms associated with hookah smoking should be delivered to individuals at-risk for hookah smoking. It is likely that misconceptions about the safety of hookah smoking could be driving, at least in-part, its increase in popularity.

PMID: 25646349 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Risks of Hookah Smoking.

Tue, 2015-02-03 06:19

Risks of Hookah Smoking.

JAMA Pediatr. 2015 Feb 1;169(2):196

Authors: Moreno MA

PMID: 25642904 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Short-term nose-only water-pipe (shisha) smoking exposure accelerates coagulation and causes cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

Sat, 2015-01-31 12:01

Short-term nose-only water-pipe (shisha) smoking exposure accelerates coagulation and causes cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress in mice.

Cell Physiol Biochem. 2015;35(2):829-40

Authors: Nemmar A, Yuvaraju P, Beegam S, Ali BH

Abstract
BACKGROUND/AIM: Water-pipe smoking (WPS) has acquired worldwide popularity, and is disseminating particularly rapidly in Europe and North America. However, little is known about the short-term cardiovascular effects of WPS.
METHODS: Presently, we assessed the short-term cardiovascular effects of nose-only exposure to mainstream WPS in BALB/c mice for 30 min/day for 5 consecutive days. Control mice were exposed to air. At the end of the exposure period, several cardiovascular endpoints were measured.
RESULTS: WPS did not affect the number of leukocytes and the plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein, tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Likewise, plasma levels of lipid peroxidation (LPO), reduced glutathione (GSH) and catalase were not affected by WPS. By contrast, WPS aggravated in vivo thrombosis by shortening the thrombotic occlusion time in pial arterioles and venules. The number of circulating platelets was reduced by WPS suggesting the occurrence of platelet aggregation in vivo. Elevated concentrations of fibrinogen and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 were seen after the exposure to WPS. Blood samples taken from mice exposed to WPS and exposed to adenosine diphosphate showed more platelet aggregation. The heart concentrations of IL-6 and TNF? were augmented by WPS. Likewise, heart levels of LPO, reactive oxygen species and the antioxidants catalase and GSH were increased by WPS. However, the systolic blood pressure and heart rate were not affected by WPS.
CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that short-term exposure to WPS exerts procoagulatory effects and induce cardiac inflammation and oxidative stress. At the time point investigated, there was no evidence for blood inflammation or oxidative stress. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

PMID: 25634761 [PubMed - in process]

[Severe recurrent carbon monoxide poisoning caused by smoking.]

Sat, 2015-01-24 06:28

[Severe recurrent carbon monoxide poisoning caused by smoking.]

Ugeskr Laeger. 2015 Jan 26;177(2A)

Authors: Rasmussen DB, Jacobsen VB

Abstract
Carbon monoxide (CO) is an odourless, colourless and toxic gas. Sources of CO include car exhaust, charcoal and tobacco smoke. CO binds to haemoglobin forming carboxyhaemoglobin (COHb). Heavy smokers have COHb levels up to 15%. There are reports of COHb levels of 24,2% caused by tobacco use and 28,7% after narghile smoking. A 54-year-old woman with schizophrenia was admitted at the intensive care unit with COHb levels as high as 35% caused by cigarillo smoking. She also presented with severe thiazide-induced hyponatriaemia and high haemoglobin levels.

PMID: 25612978 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

Pattern of shisha and cigarette smoking in the general population in malaysia.

Thu, 2015-01-22 15:42

Pattern of shisha and cigarette smoking in the general population in malaysia.

Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2014;15(24):10841-6

Authors: Al-Naggar RA, Bobryshev YV, Anil S

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Smoking is a primary risk factor for cancer development. While most research has focused on smoking cigarettes, the increasing popularity of shisha or water pipe smoking has received less attention. This study measured the prevalence and risk factors for shisha and cigarette smoking and related knowledge.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in Shah Alam, Malaysia. Participants aged ? 18 years were selected from restaurants. Data regarding demographic variables, smoking patterns, and knowledge about shisha smoking were collected in local languages. Logistic regression was performed to assess risk factors.
RESULTS: Of 239 participants, 61.9 % were male and 99.2% revealed their smoking status. Some 57.4% were smokers: 50.7% only cigarettes, 5.9% only shisha and 42% both. Mean age of starting cigarette smoking was 17.5 ± 2.4 years and for shisha smoking 18.7 ± 2.0 years. In a univariate model, male gender, age 33-52 years and monthly income > MYR 4,000 increased the risk and unemployment and being a student decreased the risk. In a multivariate model, male gender increased the risk of smoking, while being a student decreased the risk, adjusting for age and income. The perception of shisha being less harmful than cigarettes was present in 14.6% and 7.5% had the opinion that shisha is not harmful at all, while 21.7% said that it is less addictive than cigarettes, 39.7% said that shisha did not contain tar and nicotine, 34.3% said that it did not contain carbon monoxide and 24.3% thought that shisha did not cause health problems.
CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of shisha and cigarette smoking is high in the general population in Malaysia and knowledge about shisha smoking is relatively low. The findings of our study might have implications for understanding similarities and differences in incidence of shisha and cigarette smoking in other cultural/geographic regions.

PMID: 25605187 [PubMed - in process]

Hookah use predicts cigarette smoking progression among college smokers.

Thu, 2015-01-15 06:30

Hookah use predicts cigarette smoking progression among college smokers.

Nicotine Tob Res. 2015 Jan 12;

Authors: Doran N, Godfrey KM, Myers MG

Abstract
Aims: Hookah use is increasingly common among US college students, but little is known regarding the relationship between hookah and cigarette use. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the added nicotine exposure from hookah use may accelerate the uptake of cigarettes. Methods: An ethnically diverse sample of college students (n = 256; 43% female) who had smoked cigarettes in the past month completed two in-person interviews over six months. This study was a secondary analysis of data collected for a longitudinal study of young adult cigarette smoking patterns. Analyses examined 6-month changes in past 30 day cigarettes smoked and number of days smoking, controlling for age, nicotine dependence, marijuana use, and the respective baseline variable for each outcome. Results: Current hookah use (any use in past 30 days) was endorsed by 34% of participants at baseline, while 94% reported lifetime use. Change in past 30 day number of cigarettes (p = .043) and number of smoking days (p = .040) differed significantly between those who did or did not report recent hookah use at baseline. Hookah users reported a greater number of cigarettes smoked at the 6-month follow-up, while non-users decreased their smoking quantity. For number of smoking days in the past 30, hookah users reported a smaller decrease than non-users. Conclusions: Recent hookah use predicted increased cigarette smoking over 6 months in a college sample. These are the first prospective data demonstrating this relationship, indicating the value of developing strategies to prevent hookah use among college students.

PMID: 25586774 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

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